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President And Us Foreign Policy

Essay by   •  March 14, 2011  •  1,678 Words (7 Pages)  •  1,684 Views

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The United States election in 2000 raised a debate between democrat and republican and in the end the American people chose a new leader Mr. George w. Bush. President Bush clearly defined foreign policy objectives and goals. I have seen and hear our dear President Bush foreign policy after September 11. Following this, Bush has established its top priorities in foreign policy. He claims that an acts in the government to improve the international community through negotiation and cooperation. Likewise President Bush remark "It is to inspire and be inspired by other nations to work together toward a peaceful and prosperous future" (BBC News). Bush, as well as our society, feels the president should be strong- especially in international politics and policies. When the United States was attacked September 11, 2001, the people looked to the president to lead, and in essence, seek revenge. On both of these levels of domestic considerations, we will never know to exactly what extent they influence the president's choice of action, but they help us in understanding some of the foreign policy decisions. Going beyond the individual to the expectations of the position, the role consideration plays an influential domestic part in the response to an external event and ultimately foreign policymaking. Our dear President George w. Bush after the attack of September 11 has hundreds of foreign policy goals and objectives, it's most important goals currently are internationalism, national security, limiting weapons of mass destruction, and nationalism.

Towards American Internationalism, Our President Bush has encouraged democracy and democratic ideals in other countries. "American internationalism" (BBC news) is what our president call his foreign policy. American internationalism seeks to preserve liberty and to promote opportunity, human dignity, freedom, prosperity, and peace, both at home and abroad that's basically what bush American internationalism stand for. Bush, as well as our society, feels the president should be strong- especially in international politics and policies. When the United States was attacked September 11, 2001, the people looked to the president to lead, and in essence, seek revenge. On both of these levels of domestic considerations, we will never know to exactly what extent they influence the president's choice of action, but they help us in understanding some of the foreign policy decisions. Going beyond the individual to the expectations of the position, the role consideration plays an influential domestic part in the response to an external event and ultimately foreign policymaking. Furthermore to do this, Bush's administration has outlined some specific objectives. Allies are crucial to conduct foreign operations, so the Bush has joined several international organizations that allow it to serve at the forefront of international policy. Some of the more famous ones are the United Nations, which is the biggest organization and has many sub-level organizations, the World Trade Organization, the World Health Organization, the International Monetary Fund, and the World Bank Group (Directory of Economic, Commodity and Developmental Organizations). Knowing that United States is involved in these international organizations President Bush refuses to listen to UN (United Nation) and decided to attack Iraq (NY times). Today issues of terrorism, weapons of mass destruction, and Middle East peace are frontrunners in American foreign policy. These current issues facing the US, compiled with traditional objectives in international relations, dictate the current most important countries and actors to the United States.

The threat of weapons of mass destruction was enough to cause the United States to attack pre-emotively in Iraq. In the Middle east, as well as elsewhere, the threat of chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear weapons (Washington) has increased exponentially. The government does not know which groups have them, what their capabilities are, or when the United States and its allies could be attacked by them. As technologies have increased and become more available, the need to know this information has become even more crucial in order to strategize and prepare. The United States must remain close to both its allies and enemies in order to avoid the possibility of being attacked at home or abroad. Furthermore Since September 11, 2001, the United States, with the help of its allies and partners, has dismantled the Taliban, denied al-Qaida a safe haven in Afghanistan, and defeated Saddam Hussein's regime in Iraq. Many countries play a vital role with US assistance, especially regarding intelligence. Preventing terrorism on the homeland is a priority but also is prevention elsewhere. That is why consistent relations are maintained especially in the Middle East, but also elsewhere. One of President Bush's four objectives in the War with Iraq was the removal of weapons of mass destruction (Dunn). These weapons include chemical, biological, and nuclear capabilities. Many countries have, or will have nuclear capabilities, and the numbers will only increase. Not all of these countries are known but some of importance includes North Korea, Pakistan, India, Iran, and every other country with related technologies. All nuclear capable countries, both allies and otherwise, are vital to defense policy making of the United States.

Nationalism is very important to the people of United Stated and our dear President Bush uses this idea to persuade the people. Many symbols have been adopted as symbols of freedom, especially after the September 11 attacks. As a result of the rise of nationalism, ideology tends to decline, which means the United States gives ideology very little importance. Leaders such as the President Bush use example of symbol like the symbol of freedom as a symbol to persuade the citizens of the United States to agree with him. In a speech the President gave on the need for freedom in Cuba "Today, the struggle for freedom continues -- it hasn't ended -- in cities and towns of that beautiful island, in Castro's prisons, and in the heart of every Cuban patriot." (Dunn). A way nationalism is also seen in this country is in its war against terrorism. Ever since the September 11 attacks, almost all of the government's attention has been on the war against terrorism. This can be seen through a statement made by the President on July 24, 2003, "And this (September 11) was the merest glimpse of the violence terrorists are willing to inflict

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