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Manifest Destiny

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Autor:   •  December 12, 2010  •  515 Words (3 Pages)  •  355 Views

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The Manifest Destiny

From the very beginning Americans have provided excuses for their actions at the expense of people who were at the time inconvenient to their personal ambitions. The Manifest Destiny is ruled very heavily by the desire to expand and, in essence, form the American empire. The argument in favor for this desire is that God intended for this to happen, one of the many purposes and explanations that the name of God services.

This desire flourished very early during the colonial period in which borders and barriers were rebelled against with a flowering attitude, pride, and self satisfaction that marks even the modern American. The name of God was exploited to satisfy this ambition: God had intended for the people of the land to expand and culture the land. It is an extremely contradictory belief, for the natives and original settlers of the land were pushed aside as a nuisance that hindered the dream of coming true. Native Americans were relocated and promised endlessly with the attitude that they, the "true" Caucasian Americans, were doing them - an inconvenience a favor. This exploitation and domineering attitude was not given a second thought by greedy settlers: God provided the reason should any doubt ever occur.

Religion goes even further as a mind altering substance to fuel purpose. It can be seen by the Prophet Joseph Smith how far religion can extend and rule ambition. The Land of Zion was a goal that could be reached in Missouri - the true land of the Jewish race. The savages that were punished by God with their accursed skin color could be reformed to Mormonism and redeemed in the eyes of God, therefore permitting access to the great gates of Heaven. Smith and his followers were pilgrims in their desire to reach the holy destination where they could practice their fate. Disruptive practices and activities banished them from most of the "holy"


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